Cornhole. Corn Toss. Bag toss. Baggo. Dadhole.

It doesn’t matter what you call it, it’s still America’s favorite backyard game.

Cornhole is a backyard game with 2 boards, 4 people (or 2 for singles), and 8 bags. Each wood board measures 48 inches by 24 inches with a 6 inch hole approximately 6 inches from the top of the board. The boards are slightly tilted and raised by feet or legs near the hole-side of the board. For the bags, two colors are typically used to distinguish two teams and are classically 6″x6″, corn-filled canvas or duck-cloth bags. For heavy backyard usage, synthetic bags are a top-pick among Cornhole.com customers, as the filling will not absorb water and release dust like a traditional corn-filled bag would. A team can either be formatted Singles Style with 2 people, opponents at opposite ends, or via Doubles Style, with a teammate and opponent at the opposite board, and an opponent on the same board as yourself.

All bags start on one end, with Team A and Team B alternating throws, or pitches, using their teams’ colors. If a player’s bag slips in the hole, without penalties such as bouncing off the ground, that player’s team earns 3 points. If a player lands a bag on the board’s surface, without penalties, the player’s team earns 1 point. The rules on scoring and cancelling out may vary but, if you would like more play time before the game ends, points can cancel out. An example of canceling out is as follows: Team A throws a bag and it lands in the hole, Team B throws a cornhole bags and it, also, lands in the hole. Since both teams scored, in the previous scenario, the points are null until one team scores more than the other in the given round. To learn more about the exact rules of Cornhole, visit our Cornhole Gameplay Guide. 

Cornhole has been around for many years, and by different names. More near Chicago, the game is often referred to as Baggo. In the Midwest and Greater Cincinnati region, Cornhole is the usual name. From these two points spread the many roots of Cornhole and it’s pollination across America, to it’s ultimate standing as America’s favorite backyard game and the best bring-along for Tailgating events.

From Cornhole.com to someone across the street, there are many cornhole vendors to choose from. For those that are handy, know their way around a workshop and enjoy a hefty project, DIY cornhole is a given. The precision required to make a sturdy, squared-set which appropriately reacts to thrown bags requires a lot of due diligence. There are many templates available online to build your own Cornhole, followed by a paint job or applying a vinyl wrap to the board to give it a new look. Cornhole.com wrote a nice how-to on installing wraps and we encourage  you to read if you’re going to start your own Cornhole project. View Installing Wraps Guide

 

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